IFTTT, motion alerts, Gotya

Use any WiFi Security Camera as IFTTT Trigger with Gmail Channel

IFTTT (IF This Then That) is a freemium service that enables you to connect your smart home/IoT (Internet of Things) devices including WiFi security cameras to a world of Web apps such as The Weather Channel, Instagram, Twitter, Gmail, and Dropbox, to name but 5 of the 128 available “Channels”.  In addition to Web apps Channels there are also native Android and iOS Channels such as notifications and location, as well as email, SMS, and phone call channels. When something happens on a (Trigger) Channel, IFTTT enables something else to happen on another (Action) Channel.

Any IP/WiFi camera that has motion detection and email alerts can work with IFTTT as a Trigger using the Gmail Channel. For example this recipe uses Dropcam motion alerts to turn on a WeMo Light Switch.

Gotya can also turn on your Wemo Light Switch just like Dropcam does. All you need to do is i) replace noreply@dropcam.com with gotya.alerts@mobiapplines.com in the Gmail from address field as shown below and ii) make sure the Gmail address that you enter into the Gmail Channel  is the same as your Gotya Alert email address (in the Gotya app, go to Camera->Settings or Remote Controller->Select Camera->Operation).

IFTTT, trigger, wemo

As a second example of using Gotya to trigger an IFTTT channel, when Gotya detects motion it can send you an SMS alert using this recipe (you’ll need to modify it to specify your own mobile phone# and Gmail address). As with the first example, make sure the Gmail address that you enter into the Gmail Channel  is the same as your Gotya Alert email address (in the Gotya app, go to Camera->Settings or Remote Controller->Select Camera->Operation).

The  SMS alerts include the URL with the picture stored on the Gotya Cloud. For security reasons you’ll need to login to the Gotya Cloud Service each time.

motion detection sms alert, IFTTT

Gotya motion detection SMS alert with link to picture in Gotya cloud

 

There is currently only one WiFi home security camera (actually an iOS app) called Manything, that has it’s own “proper” / native IFTTT channel, enabling it to be connected to all of the 128 Channels and can be used both as a Trigger and an Action in a Recipe (and not just as a Trigger via the Gmail Channel as this article has focused on). Expect this list to grow dramatically as IFTTT has recently raised a $30M Series B Round and is going to make their Channel Platform available to a lot more developers.

SmartThings has done an unofficial integration with Dropcam and SmartThings has their own IFTTT channel, so there’s potentially other stuff that you can do with the combination of Dropcam, SmartThings, and IFTTT, but that’s perhaps a topic for another blog post. A quick search of “SmartThings Dropcam” on IFTTT Browse Recipes returned zero results.

Let us know if you have created or use any IFTTT recipes for your IP/WiFi security camera in the Comments!

nokia lumia 800, windows phone 7

In praise of older smartphones – unlike Skype, Gotya continues to support Windows Phone 7

Microsoft recently announced that Windows Phone 7 users will no longer be able to use Skype  “within the next few weeks”.  Not just discontinuing updates, bug fixes, or support, but terminating use altogether – not allowing sign-ins from Windows Phone 7 devices.

According to data from AdDuplex published on WMPoweruser, there are still 8-10 million active Windows Phone 7 users out there.

In contrast to the Skype decision, we here at Gotya are all about supporting older smartphones by enabling consumers to turn them into connected motion detection cameras for a near-free, portable DIY security and surveillance system.

Gotya supports and will continue to support Windows Phone 7. If you’re a WP7 user or  if you have upgraded to WP 8/8.1 and have your old WP7 device (like a Lumia 800, the first-ever WP7 Nokia Lumia from November, 2011)  lying around doing nothing, turn it into a near-free motion detection camera with remote snapshots and alerts with Gotya. And, you can use your current WP8/8.1 device as a remote control for your Gotya WP7 motion detection camera!

WP7 users and device owners, we got your back.

windows phone store, app of the day, gotya

How to get your app featured on Windows Phone Store

In the last two and a half weeks (since July 9th), Gotya has been featured on Windows Phone Store seven times in forty-five countries, including today in the U.S. as the Featured App Of The Day. In addition to the App of the Day promo slot (for as the name implies, one app), there are also the  App Icons (three apps) and the Spotlight (eight apps) promo slots.

See this Windows Phone Developer Blog post including a video from Inside Windows Phone, to see what criteria Windows Phone Store merchandising team uses to choose which apps to feature on the Windows Phone Store. In other words, “what is a quality app” ?

We’re thrilled that the Windows Phone Store merchandising team has deemed Gotya to be a high quality app, and just as thrilled that with nearly 200 reviews globally averaging 4.5/5 stars, our users feel the same way.

Gotya reviewed on WPCentral

We’re fortunate enough today to have the good folks at Windows Phone Central do a thorough hands-on review of Gotya for Windows Phone.

We’ve studied the review and appreciate the positives and the negatives as it will help us improve the Gotya app and Cloud Service.

We also really like the cool pic of the annoying leaping squirrel that was taken by Gotya running on a Lumia 520.

Thanks to George Ponder at WPCentral for the well-written review.

High fps motion detection and picture capture with Nexus 7

In the first post about how to capture high frame rate / high # pictures per second with Gotya, we used a 20 month old Lumia 820 that captured 8 fps and said that we’d update this post series with a Nexus 7 (2013) to show how Moore’s Law – that is, the continuous improvement in price/performance of computers including tablets and smartphones over time – both in terms of hardware like CPU and GPU and software such as O/S – means that Gotya will also continuously improve it’s maximum fps picture capture as new, more powerful devices come out.

Now that Gotya for Android is out, we’d like to share the update on how the Nexus 7 (2013) performed. This is now an 11 month old device (started shipping July 2013) and it’s successor, the Nexus 8, is already expected to be announced at Google I/O on June 25th and will be another big step in performance , less than a year since the previous generation device started shipping. So the pace of performance improvements is only increasing.

The Nexus 7 (2013) captured 10 fps in our like-for-like test in terms of camera calibration and settings, at the same location and action sequence (somebody walking at normal pace). In fact this time the active window was slightly larger (which decreases the fps) and there are six times more pixels to scan and analyze in order to perform the motion detection  (1920 x 1200 = 2.3M on the Nexus 7  vs  800 x 480 = 384K on the Lumia 820). Even still, we observed a 25% fps performance increase over the 8 fps captured by the Lumia 820 Windows Phone.

 

motion detection camera, Android security camera app

Nexus 7 Gotya motion detection camera calibration from Nexus S remote controller

 

Here’s the GIF of the 40 frames captured in 4 seconds

Gotya motion detection app for Android, Android security camera app

10 fps captured by Nexus 7 (2013)

And here’s the first and last frames of the GIF with the timestamps in the top left showing the 4 second duration.

android security app, nexus 7 motion detection camera

Frame 1 captured by Gotya on Nexus 7

 

 

android security camera app, nexus 7 motion detection camera app

Frame 40 captured by Gotya on Nexus 7

 

It’s important to highlight that these are real-world settings designed to capture pictures of a person walking at normal speed in a specific area (active window) – the path leading up to the entrance.

Gotya’s ability to capture high fps means that the details of an incident will be captured and you won’t miss a thing even when using devices 1 year old and more, making Gotya a perfect use for that old Android, Windows Phone, or Symbian device sitting around in your drawer. It also means that you don’t need a video surveillance app to capture high fps. Video apps capture 30 fps and we’ve just shown that Gotya on a one year old device captures 10 fps which is quite respectable given Gotya’s dramatically lower price and bandwidth requirementsas compared to video surveillance apps.

How does Gotya do this? With high performance native code and clever optimizations where the platform would otherwise slow down picture capture. No cross-platform IDEs or SDKS here.

We’ll provide an update with a 2014 device, maybe even the Nexus 8 or a newer spec Windows Phone 8.1 (or both),  and see how many fps Gotya captures with that new high performance device. We wouldn’t be surprised to see it real close to 15 fps.

Download Gotya Security Camera for Android now and see for yourself.

 

high frame rate, motion detection

High Frame Rate (fps) Motion Detection and Picture Capture

While video surveillance/security/monitoring apps capture video at 30 frames per second (fps), Gotya photo surveillance can capture up to 15 fps when set to high-speed motion detection. This means that you will not miss anything and be able to capture a detailed record of a motion triggered event, while realizing the benefits of photo survellance namely low upstream bandwidth usage, ability to operate on slower speed mobile data networks (2.5/3G) or slower WiFi, if high-speed WiFi is not available or is too costly, and capturing only the frames that contain motion.

And as mobile devices (smartphones and tablets) track Moore’s Law and continuously get faster CPUs, more RAM, and faster network chips,  Gotya leverages that into ever faster picture capture frame rates – 15 fps may not be the maximum.

To illustrate Gotya in high-speed (high frame rate / fps)  motion detection mode, we used a Nokia Lumia 820 Windows Phone 8 which is a 1 year and 8 months old device (began shipping in September 2012). This device has a Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 CPU (Dual-core 1.5 GHz ) and 1024 MB RAM. One of Gotya’s core benefits is enabling consumers to use their old smartphones and tablets as motion detection cameras.  A 20-month old device is representative of a real world use case, where smartphones are typically updated after 18-24 months (and often times even  faster with upgrade programs like T-Mobile JUMP).

To set Gotya for high-speed motion detection, go into Camera->Advanced Settings and set Object motion all the way to fast (20) as shown below.

motion detection speed

Object motion set to 20 (fast)

Then aim and calibrate the Gotya motion detection camera as usual – the setup for this example is shown below. The important thing to note about calibration and how it affects motion detection / frame capture speed is that the smaller the active window, the faster the motion detection gets. In this example, we’ve set the active window to about 80% of the camera viewfinder to cover the path to detect anyone walking on it and to ignore motion outside of the active window. If the active window was say 50%, motion detection speed would increase proportionally.

motion detection camera calibration

Active windows size (orange frame) ~ 80% of viewfinder

The GIF  below shows 32 frames captured in 4 seconds by Gotya with the above settings.  Included below the GIF are the first and last picture in the sequence from the Gotya Web Gallery, with timestamp in the top left corner. The first timestamp is 11:16:38 and the last timestamp is 11:16:42 = total of 4 seconds.

This means Gotya running in fast motion detection mode on a 20-month old device captured 8 frames/second.

motion detection app, fps, photo surveillance app

32 frames captured in 4 seconds on an 20-month old smartphone (Lumia 820)

 

motion detection app

Frame 1 of 32

motion detection camera app

Frame 32 of 32

 

In a future post when Gotya for Android is released (in the coming weeks), we’ll compare the frame rate capture of the 18-month old Lumia 820 to a Google-Asus Nexus 7 (2013) Android tablet which is 10 months old as of the date of this post, and has a quad-core 1.5 GHz Snapdragon S4 Pro CPU and 2GB RAM. After that we’ll benchmark a  a current device that started shipping in 2014. This will illustrate the effect of Moore’s law on Gotya’s maximum frame rate capture and we expect to be approaching or exceeding 15 fps as claimed at the top of this post.

(Featured Image courtesy of www.empirecinemas.co.uk )